ITALIAN WINE LAWS

In 1963, Italy's Ministry of Agriculture drafted the county's modern laws governing wine production, creating the Denominazione di Orgine Controllata (DOC).

The primary identifier of an Italian wine is where it comes from. Barolo is a place in southeastern Piedmont, and for a wine to be called Barolo it must come from vineyards within a specific area defined by law. There are also prescriptions controlling most aspects of production, including which grape(s) can be used and how long the wine must be aged before release. There are four classifications of Italian wine; Vino da Tavola (VdT), Indicazione Geografica Tipica (IGT), Denomination of Controlled Origin (DOC) and Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG).

 

CLASSIFICATION

VINO DA TAVOLA (VdT)
Vino da Tavola (table wine) is the most general class of wine. This wine may come from anywhere in Italy, from any grape or blend of grapes.

INDICAZIONE GEOGRAFICA TIPICA (IGT)
Indicazione Geografica Tipica wines are regulated only by the geographic production area, leaving the producer free to experiment with grapes and production methods.

DENOMINAZIONE DI ORIGINE CONTROLLATA (DOC)
Denomination of Controlled Origin is a class of wine produced in specific well-defined regions. This class requires that a wine come from a specific place delimited by law and be made with a prescribed mix of grapes.

DENOMINAZIONE DI ORIGINE CONTROLLATA E GARANTITA (DOCG)
Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita class is similar to the DOC class but more rigid. It is reserved for wines of the greatest historic or qualitative pedigree; wines labeled as such are the most tightly regulated of all classified wines.